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#Compliance: Cyberprotection, cybersecurity regulation follow NSA flap

Staff, SearchCompliance.com

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In the wake of the National Security Agency/Edward Snowden scandal, world leaders are examining ways to prevent cyberattacks -- especially those stemming from abroad. In the past week, the European Union approved a directive that toughens penalties for people convicted of cybercrime, and India announced measures that greatly expand the country's national cyberprotection plan. This was all while top Chinese and U.S. leaders met at the annual U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue in Washington, D.C. this week, where cybersecurity regulation was a major topic.

As discussions between U.S. and Chinese officials continued, reports surfaced that the cybersecurity-related talks were being undercut by both nations' recent mutual surveillance activities:

As the week progressed, it was reported that cybersecurity regulation talks between U.S. and China were going well. Some, however, expressed skepticism about the agreement:

The European Union got in on the cybersecurity regulation act as well this past week:

But, as with the U.S.-China talks, many have already asserted that the E.U.'s cybersecurity regulations don't go far enough. Because the E.U.'s biggest concern is cyberthreats from abroad, strict national cybersecurity regulation does no good, critics said.

In India this week, moves to improve national cyberprotection are largely a response to a huge increase in cybercrime, especially finance-related offenses:

India's cyberplan, of course, is receiving its share of criticism as well. This time, however, critics aren't concerned that the efforts don't go far enough -- rather, they say the cyberprotection moves could infringe upon civil rights:

What do you think of the recent worldwide focus on cybersecurity regulation? Voice your concerns in the comments section. We'd love to hear from you.

Let us know what you think about the story; email Ben Cole, site editor. For more regulatory compliance news and updates throughout the week, follow us on Twitter @ITCompliance.


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